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-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, our commitment to the gulf, and to america, has never been st
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> ron brown's in "the national journal" wrote, the main reason obama is doing better in battleground states has to do with his increase from white working women. working class women. keep in mind, back in 2008, nationally, obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, the number hovers in those cases around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. looking good for the president with white working class women. what an interesting category to be moving ahead in. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." today we saw a blow to the nationwide republican effort to suppress democratic turnout. a pennsylvania judge blocked a strict voter photo i.d. requirement from going into effect before election day. judge robert simpson wrote in part, i am not still -- i am not still convinced that there will be no voter disenfranchisement ar
was in black and white in 1960. it was argued that john f. kennedy had shown richard nixon mainly because of the way he looked on screen. do these debates boil down to style over substance? we're joined by brian callahan who coaches government and industry leaders in public speaking. how much do looks matter in this? if nixon had sweated less in that clip that we just saw, would he have done better? >> i think he would have. particularly since it was the dawn of television and people were getting visual cues for the first time. when senator kennedy looked much more comfortable than nixon, that played very much to his advantage. >> well, let's take a look at the presidential debate now in 1984. ronald reagan was asked if he was too old to be president. >> i want you to know that i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i'm not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. [laughter] >> that is also one of my favorite lines. >> that is my favorite as well. >> it is pretty good. it tells us nothing about policy but it made us laugh. >> it tells us that h
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
between nixon and kennedy. >> that was a very -- >> the actual camera. >> love actually you come in to cbs news here in new york and we have art facts every where. they are all over this new set. >> it's a museum out there. >> i was thinking about it. that debate was an interesting one. it was like did you watch it or did you hear it? if you watched it -- >> had a very different perception. >> very different. >> shows how the candidates handle pressure. is this the way i want to see the demeanor of my leader and it's credited with putting kennedy to the white house that debate because nixon had a lead at the time. >> nixon would argue he had a lead all along. that's another story. he would say the election -- that's another story. three debates, of course, first one. a lot of people think this is the most important one. we'll talk about the big debate moments over the last elections. stick with us. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday" and we'll be back with a look at the debates and how you win and how you lose on the big night. >> i got some ideas on,000 win. >> really? >> i don't
. >> oops. >> forgetting is bad, and looking bad is bad. in the very first tv debate, richard nixon refused to put on makeup. it hurt him. nixon later said -- >> more important than what you say is how you look on television. >> so campaigns obsess over details. when ronald reagan debated walter mondale, rollins and beckel were the opposing campaign managers. >> do you remember how high the podiums would be? >> days. >> we had days negotiating. >> the color of the room. >> what difference would it make to the candidate what color the room was? >> because in certain conditions, certain colors work for certain candidates. >> because mondale was shorter than reagan -- >> we wanted more distance between the two podiums. we debated between 7 1/2 feet and 9 feet for a day and a half. >> the first debate came, and reagan struggled. >> 2/3 of the defense budget pays for pay and salary -- or pay and passengers. >> he looked tired and ragged. the general observation was they just spent too much time with a 70-year-old guy trying to beat every factoid into his brain. >> people said ronald reagan is t
of how much the country has changed in a good way. but right after richard nixon became president, for vacancies appeared on the sprinkler. you never know how that's going to work. jimmy carter is the only president in american history to serve a full term without having a single nominee. there were no vacations while he was there. richard nixon was only president for five and half years. he had to leave early, remember? [laughter] geek out for appointments because chief justice warren left. john hartman and hugo black left. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, powell, and william rehnquist. and as you think about that list, it illustrates a theme that a think, it's a very important part of "the oath" but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because modern republicans dominate the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. the
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
democrat jay nixon is seeking his second term running against dave spencer also libertarian jim higgs and it's raised as lean democratic. september 21st this comes to us from kmiz-tv. it's about an hour. >> governor nixon. go ahead. >> it's a pleasure to see so many friends we have worked with for so many years one of the reasons i ran for the governor and the things i've done for the last four and a half years now, a lot of that goes back to the small town in missouri. i had an opportunity to see my mother and father actively involved in public service on the school board. my dad as the mayor and in the evenings when the phone would ring someone would call it a problem. i would often be the one that would head back to the kitchen table and plead the case of that person. what i saw with my mom and dad was a focus on making sure they help solve those problems in a positive way. they didn't ask whether the question can democrat or republican or from someone who supported him or not. they said what can we do to move our city, our area for word, and that is what i have done as your govern
5010 jobs in 48 uneconomic development. jane nixon is not within the same world. we are in the world with hurt and despair. you see people putting $5 of gas in their tank because that's all they have. people wake up tomorrow hoping it's no worse than today and is going to the good life. it's okay for him. he's been on the payroll for 26 years. he is penchant for the rest of the site that we're going to pay. i'm sorry, the real world is about results and the results is where we find ourselves. in the real world, the ceo would be fired. >> was moved her next question then. this comes from miller and goes first first two days spent. >> colombia and other communities struggling to close the achievement gap among school children of different races. statewide data shows clear racial disparities in many socioeconomic indicators such as employment, education, homeownership and business ownership. what do you make of that? and as governor, what would you do to address it? >> i think it's all about jobs. we need more people getting taxpayers a number of people living off the government. you kn
victory for president lyndon johnson, richard nixon got a landslide victory in 1972, but a landslide democratic majority in the house and senate and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still fairly and the control of liberal democrats. 4 two brief shining years or perhaps baleful years if you don't like the great society but for two years for better or for worse the united states had a government in the way that we often seek of her majesty, having a government that is a group of people who can implement a party platform that can be judged at the next election or serious elections. that is not generally the way the united states operates. courtesy of the constitution drafted in 1787 and what i want to in sister relatively unamended thereafter with regard to the basic structures we live under. the republican president, president johnson, nixon, ford, reagan and george h. w. bush not for a single day had even a single house of congress from their own political party. ronald reagan did have the senate for four years but he never had a full congress that was r
a minister to the white house, as president nixon used to do, or someone to camp david, as president carter used to do? >> the answer to your question is very simple about why i don't go to church. i have gone to church regularly all my life, and i started to here in washington. and now, in the position i hold and in the world in which we live, where embassies do get blown up in beirut -- we're supposed to talk about that on the debate the 21st, i understand -- but i pose a threat to several hundred people if i go to church. i know the threats that are made against me. we all know the possibility of terrorism. we have seen the barricades that have had to be built around the white house. and, therefore, i don't feel -- and my minister knows this and supports me in this position -- i don't feel that i have a right to go to church, knowing that my being there could cause something of the kind that we have seen in other places, in beirut, for example. and i miss going to church, but i think the lord understands. [applause] >> may i ask you, please -- [applause] -- may i ask the audience please
be johnson and richard nixon, the warren commission in that meeting, lbj tells madeleine brown after tomorrow the kennedys will never embarrass me again. that is the promise. >> guest: lyndon johnson was never at the meeting you are talking about. all the times i was working -- i have been working on lyndon johnson going through any kind of his papers and diaries and letters talking to everybody who knew him i have never found a single hinge that in and johnson had anything to do with the assassination. >> host: do you find yourself answering conspiracy questions regularly? >> guest: yes. yes. my only answer is the answer i gave. i would pursue anything that i found. >> guest: >> host: a viewer wanted to do about valid stocks 13. what kind of question is that? >> guest: the ballot box with which lyndon johnson's old reelection. six days after running for the senate in 1948, six day after the election he is still behind. suddenly a ballot box from precinct, found in the desert. it contains a number of votes. if i have this right 2 in hundred two votes. interesting votes because they are writte
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
's got to score. >> there was a time between the famous kennedy-nixon tapes that there were no televised debates. why are they considered so vital now? >> well, the kennedy-nixon debates created so much attention in 1960. many people think that's why ted kennedy won. if you recall ford made famously the gap that -- and then certainly by 1980, ronald reagan was very behind in the polls was just able to tidal wave over jimmy carter with quips like there you go again in a sort of staged format. since 1980, they have become part of the american landscape. >> the "new york times" recently wrote about this debate prep and the president of the united states is an awesome figure merely to share the platform with him on equal terms is the gain in stature, good performance will be gauged even better. why would any president agree to participate in an event that ultimately -- the -- because it's become now a demand, president obama suddenly bailed on debates. then, you know, he would be seeming like a poor sport. and also these debates are agreed upon long before the fall season, they're everything
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
was behind the crash, but witnesses say it took just seconds for nixon's car to run a stop sign on indian street and go into the water. >> i looked over. i saw the car. it was coming through the parking lot. looked like it was barrelling pretty fast. and then i saw it go over the edge and water come up. that scared me. >> but he was among those who went straight into the water. others called 911. >> it was nerve wracking. kind of chaotic in trying to figure it out. trying to call for help. >> police happen to be on patrol next door. firefighters were training in ocean gateway. they got to the water. this was a true team effort. you can see even as he approaches the car an unidentified woman completely pulled nixon out. >> without the efforts of the bystanders, it might have been a completely different outcome. >> paramedics used rows to pull her out of the water. many who jumped in, had to be treated for hypo thermia. everyone was feeling lucky. >> everybody did a good job helping out. >> nixon is badly hurt but in stable condition. thanks to a little bit of luck and a lot of caring witne
, another amazing recognition, 40 years ago the clean water act was signed by president richard nixon who was viewed as a conservative. there seemed to be a consensus protecting the environment was important. what's happened to the consensus. why is even the notion of global warming under attack by the republican party and those on the right? >> i think it is not politically expedient. i think you know, people on that side of the aisle probably have a lot to gain from the status quo. and changing things the way we need to isn't necessarily convenient. but the truth is you know, i don't understand it. i don't understand it. science has been rejected on so many counts and things like the clean water act which make sense. before the clean water act was passed, the quality of water was governed by each state individually. and it wasn't working. rivers were catching on fire. the clean water act was passed. there were federal regulations governing the quality of our water. and things got a lot better and now we want to
. kennedy ran for president in 1960 against nixon, his theme of that campaign is, we can do better. and he was saying basically, look, the economic growth rate is not high enough and we can have more unemployment employme country. the economic growth is higher than what it is today. by the way, ali, i have not become a democrat. what i'm saying is that i think mitt romney really needs to reach out to americans aspirations and say, look, this economy is not doing nearly as well as we want. >> how much does housing count on this? if you're part of the economy, you have a job and you've got a little money in the bank, you're moving forward, again. you're refinancing. >> or at least you feel like you're moving forward. >> how important is the housing component of this to consumer confidence? >> it's very important because one reasons why americans weren't spending over the last two or three years, as you guys know, people's wealth was falling because the value of their home, which is still, for most americans, the primary asset was falling in value. if we can see an increase in home valus and
-aways as an issue, that goes back to kennedy and nixon. we've been talking about this part of reaction shots over 50 years. candidates still haven't mastered the thought you have to think about what you're looking like when you don't speak. bill clinton was one who actually used to practice his facial expressions for when he wasn't talking. i think most candidates would poo-poo that idea, but i think there is value in it. >> there is spin room for both sides, but the spin is going to be happening in the moment through social media, through twitter, through facebook. do you think that is a huge development because one false move can be global in a matter of seconds and trending on twitter? >> absolutely. you're on to something with that theory. i think twitter becomes the new spin room. the difference is that the spin room is spinning during the debate, not necessarily after. also, always before the spinning was handed down from the top down, and now you've got everybody in the country with the ability to weigh in and have an opinion as the debate is happening. i see a shift in a couple of ways. not
september leads can evaporate by election day. hubert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. nixon won by less than 1%. jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll and narrowly lost. the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a regan landslide. >> with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others is that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times particularly from news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the convention. the loss to bush by 7%. a former are clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2
in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between nixon and mcgovern. on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kiss jer made a surprise declaration. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> it was the fird so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win reelection for nixon 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election. despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated. setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with ryan to delay freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> fast forward to 1992, president jhw bush was on the ropes a
i explored it i assumed that kennedy had beaten nixon decisively but it only moved the poll as couple of spots but it allowed kennedy to prove that he could be president, to pass the threshold. acceptability in stature. same thing with jimmy carter. carter would not have been president without debates and kennedy said he wouldn't have been. sometimes it works at wary. generally, and, reagan, one debate, it was decisive, with one debate in 1980 and the last week of the campaign, because it allowed reagan to prove he wasn't dangerous. for romney the debate is all about being able to prove if my opinion several things, but most importantly, that he is not a bad person. he has 90 minutes, the obama campaign has spent several million defining him in a way that he murders people, that he is grossly for the rich. >> what does romney have to do? >> he needs to articulate a plan as to what he will do to change america. pat is right, he has to make himself accessible to the american people. beyond that, unless people get a sense that he has a clear at stiff vision for the country and
elections, nixon or al gore. what those candidates lost on is likability. how do you take an aggressive tone? how do you go after the president on his record without coming off course? how do you be the likeable guy? >> yeah. well, mitt romney just needs to be mitt romney. i don't think that's a contradiction. but i do think it is somewhat of a tight rope. have you to find the right and proper balance. now, mitt romney went through 19 debates in the primary season. going through that, you know, people said, oh, he had trouble connecting. i didn't buy that at all. he connected better than anybody else. i think he does do that. if mitt's just mitt, he's going to just fine. >> nice to see you, sir. thanks for being with us. >> thanks, soledad. >>> at the top of the hour we'll talk to stephanie cutter, deputy manager for the obama campaign. she'll be joining us. you can watch complete coverage and analysis of the first presidential debate which starts here tonight, 7 p.m. eastern right here on cnn and cnn.com. >>> other stories making news, and john berman has those for us. good morning. >> othe
they helped john kennedy overtake richard nixon. 1980 helped reagan over take carter. 2000 helped bush overtake gore. romney was behind in 02 race for governor in massachusetts, he was trailing badly six weeks before the election. the campaign reorganized, romney pulled his advisors together. they decided on a new strategy which was to get tough and get specific and romney went on to win that 2002 race for governor in massachusetts. so we will see if he can repeat history here with these debates starting tonight. dagen and connell? connell: peter barnes reporting from denver for us. let's go to ron paul now, republican congressman from texas and former presidential candidate himself. he's calling in today on the telephone from texas. congressman paul, always good to talk to you. if a paul supporter is watching the debate tonight and needs to be convinced by romney, what does romney have to do, do you think? >> make sure he sounds a little bit different than the other and be convincing that his policies are a lot different. many people that joined the freedom movement were frustrated, y
. this is nixon's secret plan for years later. if they think they can cut tax rates and close these loopholes and expenditures, they have to name them. you have to be honest with the american people. they are being totally dishonest. somehow, they think that people will buy it. dagen: dishonest is a big word. mitt romney has alluded towards meeting to let congress -- this will be a comprehensive tax reform. >> if you do not tell the american people it darkly where you will get all of this revenue so you can get a tax break to everybody, and you are not preparing the way, not getting a mandate so once you are collected you can actually do something. will they get rid of the health deduction looks like yes or no. will they wipe out the retirement deductions? yes or no. they will not name a single name and i think it is a vindication of how far the republican party has gotten lost. we cannot afford any tax cuts. we have to deal with our deficit. that will mean spending cuts for everybody. dagen: is it a mistake to run on this at all? how can you focus been on, because the issue is growth and job
it was a game changer when president kennedy debated richard nixon. same was true with ronald reagan when he debated jimmy carter. it can make a difference. mitt romney needs to come out and be very aggressive about the president's policies and his solutions. and i think he will do real good. >> we know they've been rehearsing zingers or we're told by a "new york times" report this morning that mitt romney has been practicing zingers. i guess practicing them on some of his aides as well. you just talked about substance. others have been focusing on, well, really it's the moments and the zingers that make the difference. which do you think it is? >> there has to be a sense throughout -- at the end of the debate, the viewer will have a sense as to who can be the better leader for the united states. and mitt romney has to come across as, well, he can do a better job leading the united states on domestic policies. so it's an impression that the viewer will get overall. it will be the zingers. but it will be really the impression. who can create the better impression of leadership and that person
. in the 1960s, 1960 election when richard nixon came out looking very haggard against the sharp and attractive john f. kennedy, and in 2000 when gore was condescending toward george w. bush. the point is, more than zingers, what seems to affect the outcome is your general likability. how you come across. last point, carol, i saw newt gingrich give advice to mitt romney. he said that these debates. his expert told him it's 85% visual, how you look, 10% how you say something, your tone, and 5%, only 5% what you actually say. that would certainly reinforce this likability prism. >> well, that 5%'s kind of depressing. >> it is. >> well, let me ask you this about likability. remember in 2008, obama had a problem with likability and he's turned that around. he's now the more likable candidate. there is a danger to him to appear unlikable in this debate if he gets too snippy or too condescending or too professorial. >> absolutely because he's coming from a position of authority or power. everyone expects him to win this debate, everyone, apparently except for governor chris christie. so he will have
to that that birth control access should be a non-partisan issue. president nixon signed title 10 into law. it was a republican value for less government intrusion in our lives and good, fiscal conservatism. $1 investment pays $4 in unnecessary costs. as we know today, social ideology is forcing some of our politicians to be more socially conservative and fiscally responsible because they recognize it is just good, public health. >> i get a little nervous about some of these responses, frankly. there is a tension between the government and the individual. it is in certain areas. i can practically agree with everything, but not absolutely. the government, at times, has to force employers to pay a minimum wage. the government has to force big companies -- the government has a lot of things that the government has to do. you live with this tension. be very careful. i think the best solution is a single-payer system. [applause] i have always said to my opponents, i never heard anybody, when they are getting on an airplane, saying, get the government off my back. [laughter] [applause] >> it bri
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)

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